Anime Lovers

This is Best Japanese Manga that you must read. Why ? because i think this manga have a lot reader and fans in around the world. almost every week, millions of fans awaited for a new series. So let’s start reading :)

 

Best Japanese Manga that you must read, 5 of them have a lot fans around the world. so let’s start read this best manga article and enjoy it.

5. Gintama

Gintama all Character

Gin Tama (Japanese: 銀魂 Hepburn: Gintama?, lit. “Silver Soul”), also styled as Gintama, is a best Japanese manga written and illustrated by Hideaki Sorachi and serialized, beginning on December 8, 2003, in Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump. Set in Edo which has been conquered by aliens named Amanto, the plot follows life from the point of view of samurai Gintoki Sakata, who works as a freelancer alongside his friends Shinpachi Shimura and Kagura in order to pay the monthly rent. Sorachi added the science fiction setting to develop characters to his liking after his editor suggested doing a historical series.

The series has been adapted into an original video animation (OVA) by Sunrise and was featured at Jump Festa 2006 Anime Tour in 2005. This was followed by a full anime series, which debuted on April 4, 2006 in TV Tokyo and finished on March 25, 2010. A sequel titled Gintama ’​ first premiered in Japan on April 4, 2011 and ended on March 26, 2012, before returning once again for a brief run from October 4, 2012 to March 28, 2013. A continuation of the TV anime series titled Gintama° began airing on April 8, 2015. Two animated films have also been produced. Besides the anime series, there have been various light novels and video games based on Gin Tama.

The manga has been licensed by Viz Media in North America. In addition to publishing the individual volumes of the series, Viz serialized its first chapters in their Shonen Jump manga anthology. It debuted in the January 2007 issue, and was serialized at a rate of one chapter a month. The website Crunchyroll purchased the anime’s streaming rights, while Sentai Filmworks licensed the series, with distribution from Section23 Films on DVDs.

In Japan, the Gin Tama manga has been popular, selling over 46 million copies. The anime and its DVDs have been featured, at various time, in Top Ten of their respective media, while TV Tokyo has announced that the first Gin Tama anime was responsible for high sales overseas along with the anime adaptation from Naruto. Publications for manga, anime and others have commented on the Gin Tama manga. Positive response have focused on the comedy and characters from the series, while negative responses concern the manga’s artwork.

 

Gintama Main Characters :

sakata Gintoki

1. Gintoki Sakata (Japanese: 坂田 銀時 Hepburn: Sakata Gintoki) is a fictional character in the manga and anime franchise Gin Tama created by Hideaki Sorachi. Gintoki is the protagonist of the series and his name serves as the basis of the series’ title. He is introduced as a former rebel samurai who lives in a fictionalized version of 1860s Japan after being invaded and transformed by aliens. Gintoki once fought the alien invaders until he realized the lack of sense in doing so, leading to him choosing to instead make a living as a freelancer for hire in Edo alongside his friends Shinpachi Shimura and Kagura in order to pay the monthly rent.

Gintoki’s character has received critical response from various reviewers and publications for manga, anime and other media. Gintoki has also remained highly popular with Gin Tama fans, ranking first in all of the popularity polls. As the main character, Gintoki has appeared in most of the episodes of the anime series Gintama and Gintama’, as well as in other media related to the franchise, including the film and all of the spin-off video games and original video animations. Merchandise based on Gintoki has also been released, including figurines.

Kagura,Gintama

2. Kagura (神楽, Kagura) is a member of the Yorozuya and the main female protagonist of Gintama. She is a member of the Yato Tribe and the daughter of Umibouzu and the younger sister of Kamui, one of the main antagonists of the series.

During her childhood Kagura lived in the slums of a faraway planet with her father, mother and older brother. At one point in her life her older brother Kamui attempted to kill their father Umibouzu, however he failed and only managed to cut off his father’s arm. This caused Umibouzu to go berserk and he nearly killed Kamui but was stopped by Kagura. Soon after that, Umibozu left the family. In fear that he might harm her unintentionally just like Kamui, Umibozu left to avoid further destroying his family [1].

While at home, Kagura was left with taking care of her sick mother and she would wait for Umibouzu to come back from his alien hunting work. Kagura called her mother ‘Mummy’ and she remembered her as a beautiful woman. Her mother died of an illness when she was very young. Knowing her brother and father weren’t around, she travelled to Earth to start a new life.

Kagura had a number of pets named ‘Sadaharu No.X’ before the current Inugami Sadaharu came along. The previous pets all died because of her own inability to control her massive strength and killing the pets inadvertently. ‘Sadaharu No. 28’ was the latest deceased addition in the form of a dung beetle. ‘Sadaharu No.1’ was a rabbit.

Shimura Shinpaci

3. Shimura Shinpachi is a member of the Yorozuya, a samurai in training, and one of the three main protagonists of Gintama. He is one of the more normal characters of the series, delivering the requisite reality-checks or punchlines against other characters farcical antics. Other than working at the Yorozuya, Shinpachi is also the leader of Terakado Tsuu’s fanclub: Terakado Tsuu’s Imperial Guards, and is very serious about it.

Shimura Shinpachi grew up with his sister Shimura Tae and his father in their family dojou Koudoukan. Their father died when they were young, leaving them to take care of the dojou and the debt to the Loan Shark Amanto.[1]

At his local temple school, Shinpachi befriended Takachin. When Takachin was bullied by other children, Shinpachi tried to help but ended getting beaten up as well until Otae saved them. They were close friends until Takachin accidently soiled himself while Shinpachi pretended to be sleeping to avoid helping Takachin.

Shinpachi would later become acquainted with Yagyuu Kyuubei due to his sister’s friendship with her. When the debt collectors tried to harm Tae and her brother, Shinpachi was knocked out by the time Kyuubei came to help them, although it cost her her left eye.

Shinpachi mentioned that he ate his sister’s cooking when he was younger, which made his eyesight go bad and resulted in his need to wear glasses.

While working at a café and being beaten by the manager behind the shop, Shinpachi encountered Terakado Tsuu during one of her street performances. Although he didn’t understood her song, he was emotionally moved. After gaining encouragement and motivation from this encounter, Shinpachi would create the Terakado Tsuu fanclub: Terakado Tsuu’s Imperial Guards.

 

4. Kuroko’s Basketball (Kuroko no Basuke)

Kuroko's Basketball

Kuroko’s Basketball, known in Japan as Kuroko no Basuke (黒子のバスケ), is a best Japanese  manga series at sports category written and illustrated by Tadatoshi Fujimaki. The English rendering The Basketball Which Kuroko Plays also appears in the artwork of the Japanese version. It was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from December 2008 to September 2014, with the individual chapters collected into 30 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha. It tells the story of a high school basketball team trying to make it to the national tournament.

By April 2014, Kuroko’s Basketball had 27 million copies in circulation. It was adapted into an anime television series by Production I.G that began airing in 2012, with a second season that began airing in October 2013 and a third season that began airing in January 2015. A sequel manga by Fujimaki titled Kuroko’s Basketball: Extra Game (黒子のバスケ EXTRA GAME) began serialization in Jump Next! on December 29, 2014. Viz Media has licensed the manga for publication in North America. A theatrical film for the anime was announced at the KuroBas Cup 2015 event on September 20, 2015 and is currently in production.

Kuroko’s Basketball Main Characters :

Kuroko Tetsuya

1. Tetsuya Kuroko (黒子 テツヤ Kuroko Tetsuya) is the main protagonist of the manga, Kuroko no Basuke. He was the Phantom Sixth Player of the Generation of Miracles at Teikō Junior High. He specialises in misdirection and passes. He now plays as a regular with Seirin with the goal of bringing the team and Taiga Kagami to the top of Japan.

Kuroko has a fragile outlook and a very small build for a basketball player which is why he is usually seen passing. He has light blue hair that he styles to his left. His eyes are blue, and he has a blank gaze. His skin is fairly pale. He wears the white, black, and red Seirin jersey with the number 11. He also sometimes wears black sweatbands. His basketball shoes are white with a blue streak. He wore no. 15 jersey when he was in junior high. He also wears it in practices. He wore He wore the no. 8 jersey as a recruit, and no.16 when he was still a 2nd stringer.

When out of training or matches, he wears his school uniform: the standard Japanese gakuran. The top piece of a gakuran is black, long-sleeved and has a standing collar which buttons from the bottom up to his chin. It has blue trimming on the sleeves and vertically in the middle. He also wears regular black pants. It has been noted that his bed-head is especially atrocious.

Kagami Taiga

2. Taiga Kagami (火神 大我 Kagami Taiga) is the deuteragonist of the Kuroko no Basuke series as well as the ace and power forward of Seirin High. He is Tetsuya Kuroko’s basketball colleague and friend. He is determined to defeat the Generation of Miracles and become the best in Japan.

Kagami has exceptional basketball talents and has been called “The Miracle who did not become one of the Miracles”. Kagami is very muscular for a high school student. He is very tall, which gives him an overwhelming aura, which some say is like the intensity of a wild tiger.[2] He has toned deep bright dark red hair and red eyes. His eyes are pointed and narrow and his eyebrows are quite thick and split in two, which Murasakibara does not fail to remark. He wears the red, black and white Seirin High jersey with the number 10 and wears black and red basketball shoes. He is also occasionally seen with a shiny metal necklace with a ring on it, that represents his brotherhood with Tatsuya Himuro. When he is seen in his school uniform, he keeps his gakuran unzipped, while wearing a white shirt underneath.

Generation of Miracles A.k.A Kiseki No Sedai

3. The Generation of Miracles (キセキの世代 Kiseki no Sedai) is an all-star team of Teikō Junior High. It is a team of 5 (arguably 6) players, each with their own exceptional talent. The team won the junior high school Nationals the last three consecutive years, but the five players are now scattered across five different schools, rivaling each other in high school basketball competitions. Notable is the existence of a sixth phantom player, Tetsuya Kuroko, who was their sixth man and is closely affiliated to them.

Because they are legends among high school basketball, Kagami has set his eyes on each one of them. As ambitious as he is, he aims to defeat them and become the number one in Japan. Kuroko has agreed to help him get to the top.

The Generation of Miracles : (form left to right)

  1. Daiki Aomine (青峰 大輝 Aomine Daiki)
  2. Shintarō Midorima (緑間 真太郎 Midorima Shintarō)
  3. Seijūrō Akashi (赤司 征十郎 Akashi Seijūrō?)
  4. Ryōta Kise (黄瀬 涼太 Kise Ryōta?)
  5. Atsushi Murasakibara (紫原 敦 Murasakibara Atsushi?)

The Generation of Miracles are easily recognized as the best players in the league. Their exceptional talents are making them being called as “monsters”, only being rivaled by players like Kuroko, Kagami, the Uncrowned Kings, arguably Himuro and former Teiko basketball player Haizaki.

3. Hunter x Hunter

Hunter X hunter

Hunter × Hunter (Japanese: ハンターハンター Hepburn: Hantā Hantā, stylized as HUNTER×HUNTER) is a best Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Yoshihiro Togashi. It has been serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump magazine since March 3, 1998, although the manga has frequently gone on hiatus since 2006. As of December 2012, 340 chapters have been collected into 32 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha. The story focuses on a young boy named Gon Freecss, who discovers that his father, who he was told was dead, is actually alive and a world-renowned Hunter, a licensed profession for those who specialize in fantastic pursuits such as locating rare or unidentified animal species, treasure hunting, surveying unexplored enclaves, or hunting down lawless individuals. Despite being abandoned by his father, Gon departs upon a journey to follow in his footsteps, pass the rigorous Hunter Examination, and eventually find his father. Along the way, Gon meets various other Hunters and also encounters the paranormal. The original inspiration for the manga came from Togashi’s own collecting hobby.

In 1999, Hunter × Hunter was adapted into a 62-episode anime television series produced by Nippon Animation and directed by Kazuhiro Furuhashi. The show premiered on Japan’s Fuji TV and ran until 2001. Three separate original video animations (OVAs) totaling 30 episodes were subsequently produced by Nippon Animation and released in Japan from 2002 to 2004. A second anime television series by Madhouse aired on Nippon Television from October 2011 to September 2014, with two animated theatrical films released in 2013. There are also numerous audio albums, video games, musicals, and other media based on Hunter × Hunter. The best manga has been translated into English and released in North America by Viz Media since April 2005. Both television series were also licensed by Viz, with the first having aired on the Funimation Channel in 2009.

Hunter × Hunter has been a huge financial success and has become one of Shueisha’s best-selling best manga series, having sold over 65.8 million copies in Japan alone as of February 2013

Hunter x Hunter Main Characters :

Gon, Hunter x Hunter

1. Gon Freecss (ゴン=フリークス, Gon Furīkusu) is a Hunter and the son of Ging Freecss. Finding his father is Gon’s motivation in becoming a Hunter. Gon is a young boy with long spiky black green tipped hair and large, hazel brown eyes. His usual outfit is composed of a green jacket with reddish edges covering a black or white tank top underneath, green short shorts, and green, laced boots. In some arcs such as the Greed Island and Chimera Ant arcs he takes off the jacket and wears only the tank top. In the Greed Island arc and at the beginning of the Chimera Ant arc he wears the Paladin’s Necklace, a Greed Island card with the ability to purge any external effects to a card the wearer is holding.

 

Killua Zoldyck

2. Killua Zoldyck (キルア=ゾルディック, Kirua Zorudikku) is the heir of the Zoldyck Family, until he runs away from home and becomes a Hunter. He is the best friend of Gon Freecss.

Killua has spiky silver hair, very light skin and blue eyes. His eyes change shape depending on the mood that he’s in, narrowing and sharpening when he goes into assassin mode. Killua is fairly lean at the start of the series, due to constant physical conditioning and torture training he received when he was young. As time passes, he becomes more muscular and toned. In the Nippon Animation anime adaptation, Killua’s eye color is changed to green during the OVAs. He is also often seen holding a green skateboard (turned yellow in the 2011 series).

Killua typically wears baggy clothing, with his usual attire consisting of long-sleeved and dark-colored shirts. Most of his clothes have a turtleneck. Killua wears long, baggy shorts in the manga and Madhouse animated adaptation, but Nippon Animation’s character design shortened them to reach above his knees. Killua also wears blue boots, recolored brown and black in the Nippon Animation adaptation.

As a child, Killua’s hair is longer, almost cascading to his shoulders. He wore a hoodie with his trademark blue coloring, grey pants, and shoes.

2. Naruto

Naruto

Naruto (ナルト) is a best Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Masashi Kishimoto. It tells the story of Naruto Uzumaki, an adolescent ninja who constantly searches for recognition and dreams to become the Hokage, the ninja in his village who is acknowledged as the leader and the strongest of all. The series is based on a one-shot best manga by Kishimoto that was published in the August 1997 issue of Akamaru Jump.

Naruto was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump magazine from the 43rd issue of 1999 to the 50th issue of 2014, with the chapters collected into seventy-two tankōbon volumes by Shueisha. The manga was later adapted into a television anime, which was produced by Studio Pierrot and Aniplex. It premiered across Japan on the terrestrial TV Tokyo and other TX Network stations on October 3, 2002. The first series lasted 220 episodes, while Naruto: Shippuden, a sequel to the original series, has been airing since February 15, 2007. In addition to the anime series, Studio Pierrot has developed ten movies and several original video animations. Other types of merchandise include light novels, video games, and trading cards developed by several companies.

Viz Media has licensed the manga and anime for North American production. Viz serialized Naruto in their digital Weekly Shonen Jump magazine, as well as publishing the individual volumes. The anime series began airing in the United States and Canada in 2005, and later in the United Kingdom and Australia in 2006 and 2007, respectively. The films, as well as most OVAs from the series, have also been released by Viz, with the first film premiering in cinemas. Naruto: Shippuden was first released by Viz in North America in September 2009, started broadcast on Disney XD in October of the same year and on Adult Swim’s Toonami block in January 2014. Viz Media began streaming both series on their streaming service Neon Alley in December 2012.

As of October 2015, the best japanese manga has sold over 220 million copies worldwide, making it the third best-selling manga series in history.The manga is also available in 35 countries outside Japan. It has also become one of North American publisher Viz Media’s best-selling manga series. Their English adaptation of the series has appeared in the USA Today Booklist several times and volume 7 won the Quill Award in 2006. Reviewers of the series have praised the balance between fighting and comedy scenes, as well as the characters’ personalities, but have criticized it for using standard shōnen manga plot elements.

Naruto Main Characters :

Naruto Uzumaki

1. Naruto Uzumaki (うずまきナルト, Uzumaki Naruto) is a shinobi of Konohagakure. He became the jinchūriki of the Nine-Tails on the day of his birth — a fate that caused him to be ostracised by most of Konoha throughout his childhood. After joining Team Kakashi, Naruto worked hard to gain the village’s acknowledgement all the while chasing his dream to become Hokage. In the following years, through many hardships and ordeals, he became a capable ninja regarded as a hero both by the villagers, and soon after, the rest of the world. He soon proved to be one of the main factors in winning the Fourth Shinobi World War, leading him to achieve his dream and become the village’s Seventh Hokage (七代目火影, Nanadaime Hokage,

 

Uchiha Sasuka

2. Sasuke Uchiha (うちはサスケ, Uchiha Sasuke) is one of the last surviving members of Konohagakure’s Uchiha clan. After his older brother, Itachi, slaughtered their clan, Sasuke made it his mission in life to avenge them. He is added to Team 7 upon becoming a ninja and, through competition with his rival and best friend, Naruto Uzumaki, Sasuke starts developing his skills. Dissatisfied with his progress, causing him to defect from Konoha so that he can acquire the strength needed to have his revenge. His years of seeking vengeance become increasingly demanding and irrational and isolates him from others, leading him to become an international criminal. After proving instrumental in ending the Fourth Shinobi World War and being redeemed by Naruto, Sasuke decides to return to Konoha and dedicates his life to helping protect the village and its inhabitants

 

 

Sakura Haruno

3. Sakura Uchiha (うちはサクラ, Uchiha Sakura, née Haruno (春野)) is a kunoichi of Konohagakure. When she is assigned to Team 7, Sakura quickly finds herself ill-prepared for the duties of a ninja and the complications of her team-mates’ lives. By training under her master, Tsunade, she becomes a strong kunoichi and an excellent medical-nin, capable of facing the challenges of life as a ninja, as well as helping her friends and loved ones when they need her.

 

 

1. One Piece

One Piece Manga

One Piece (Japanese: ワンピース Hepburn: Wan Pīsu?) is a best Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Eiichiro Oda. It has been serialized in Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump magazine since July 19, 1997, with the chapters collected into seventy-nine tankōbon volumes to date. One Piece follows the adventures of Monkey D. Luffy, a funny young man whose body gained the properties of rubber after unintentionally eating a Devil Fruit. With his diverse crew of pirates, named the Straw Hat Pirates, Luffy explores the ocean in search of the world’s ultimate treasure known as “One Piece” in order to become the next Pirate King.

The manga has been adapted into an original video animation (OVA) produced by Production I.G in 1998, and an anime series produced by Toei Animation, which began broadcasting in Japan in 1999 and has aired 725 episodes to date. Additionally, Toei has developed thirteen animated feature films, two OVAs, and five television specials. Several companies have developed various types of merchandising such as a trading card game, and a large number of video games. The best manga series was licensed for an English language release in North America by Viz Media, in the United Kingdom by Gollancz Manga, and in Australia by Madman Entertainment. The anime series was licensed by 4Kids Entertainment for an English-language release in North America, before the license was dropped and subsequently acquired by Funimation in 2007.

One Piece has received widespread critical acclaim, primarily for its art, characterization and humor. Several volumes of the manga have broken publishing records, including highest initial print run of any book in Japan. The official website for Eiichiro Oda’s One Piece manga announced that the manga has set a Guinness World Record for “the most copies published for the same comic book series by a single author”. As of June 2015, the manga has 320 million copies printed worldwide, making it the best japanese manga series in history.

One Piece Main Characters :

Mugiwara Luffy Best Japanese Manga

1. Monkey D. Luffy, also known as “Straw Hat Luffy” and commonly as “Straw Hat”, is a pirate and the main protagonist of the anime and manga, One Piece. He is the son of the Revolutionary Army’s commander, Monkey D. Dragon, the grandson of the famed Marine, Monkey D. Garp, the foster son of a mountain bandit, Curly Dadan, and the adopted brother of the late “Fire Fist” Portgas D. Ace and Sabo – the Revolutionary Army’s Chief of Staff. His lifelong dream is to become the Pirate King by finding the legendary treasure left behind by the late Pirate King, Gol D. Roger. He believes that being Pirate King means having the most freedom in the world. He has eaten the Gomu Gomu no Mi, which gives the consumer’s body the properties of rubber. As the founder and captain of the Straw Hat Pirates, he is the first member of the crew, as well as one of its top three fighters.

Luffy has a worldwide reputation for causing trouble, challenging the Shichibukai, the Marines, and even a Yonko, additionally committing felonies and actions which were deemed threatening by the World Government. Furthermore, in the majority of these confrontations, he emerges as the victor. He has gained a reputation for being “reckless” and, in some cases, “insane”, after causing an incident in Enies Lobby, assaulting a World Noble at Sabaody Archipelago, entering and escaping from Impel Down, and joining the Battle of Marineford.

He is, therefore, infamous for being the only known pirate to not only deliberately attack the three most important government facilities, but also escape from all of them alive. The additional fact that he punched a World Noble with full knowledge of the consequences, as well as his heritage, has caused Luffy to be labeled as a “Dangerous Future Element”, earning the wrath of Fleet Admiral Sakazuki and making the Marines among his greatest enemies.

These acts, among other things, have given him his current bounty of Beli500,000,000, one of the highest past or present bounties in the series. Having had a bounty of Beli300,000,000 prior to his arrival at the Sabaody Archipelago, Luffy is one of eleven rookie pirates who has been referred to as the “Eleven Supernovas”, pirates with bounties over Beli100,000,000 who have reached the Red Line. He is also one of twelve pirates referred to as “The Worst Generation” (formerly known as “The Eleven Supernovas”

 

 

DONE. This is 5 Best Japanese Manga that you must read in your life. If you have some question, let’s us know in comment . Thank you for reading

join our home page in anneonlineprenuer.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

With its second season almost over, Noragami has quickly established itself as one of the most beloved new anime of the past few years. As it follows the adventures of a rookie god trying to earn a following in the rough-and-tumble world of Japan’s spiritual marketplace, the show has something for everyone, if they can stomach a bit of culture shock. While Noragami has everything a mainstream anime could want – strong action, charming characters, and even surprising depth – it’s also very rooted in Japanese culture, specifically Shinto religious practices. So here’s a short primer on what you might not know about Japanese culture, mythology, and religion, as seen in Noragami. Why is Yato so intent on securing his fortune five cents at a time? Is Bishamon really a tall blonde lady? Why did Ebisu call Izanami “mother?” The answers are all here, folks!

First off, a quick run-down of where the Shinto religion comes from. Unlike Christianity, Shinto doesn’t have a single written text that serves as the basis for all belief. Rather, it’s based on the belief that supernatural forces known as kami exist all over the natural world. Kami can be pretty much anything – from anthropomorphic figures to monsters to forces of nature. Shinto’s original practitioners worshipped kami in order to placate them. They lived at the mercy of nature and sought to exert some control by personifying and bribing it. Kami, in turn, reflect nature in their temperaments – they alternately give or withhold, usher in life or deal out death. Over time, the practices of placating kami turned into established traditions that people participate in even when they aren’t at risk of death by flood, drought, or disease. The reasons for worshiping some kami changed, and they became associated with things like commerce, academics, or war. People still visit shrines all the time, whether it’s for specific holidays (like New Year’s), ceremonies (like weddings or births), or even good luck in an upcoming event (like a test). Festivals (matsuri) are also religious celebrations.

Shinto isn’t a belief system where you need to be baptized or somehow confirmed as a member. While most Japanese people participate in Shinto rituals, very few are members of Shinto sects or would even describe themselves as practitioners. Shinto practices are firmly entwined with secular Japanese society, giving the religion a nationalist grounding. The emperor of Japan is even considered a kami, descended from one of the most important deities, the sun goddess Amaterasu. This is why you don’t encounter non-Japanese Shintoists in the same way you do Buddhists or Christians, two religions that originated far from both Japan and North America. Shinto just isn’t supposed to spread. Instead, it remains in Japan and absorbs elements from other belief systems that arrive there, like Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Taoism, etc. I’m sure even Jesus has managed to work his way in there somehow.

Religious and secular life intertwines more easily in Japan than in North America. It would be unthinkable to deck out a church with advertisements for a television show (especially one featuring hunky cartoon versions of biblical figures), but you can often see shrines decked out in promotions for anime. You can also buy things at shrines (like lucky charms, talismans, or curses), get your fortune told, or leave a wish for the kami on a wooden placard. None of these things need be serious.

You can also make donations at shrines, traditionally in the form of a five-yen coin. This explains Yato’s fixation on such a tiny amount of money, but these coins have a symbolic value as well. The Japanese for “five yen,” go en, sounds a lot like go-en, a phrase that signifies giving respect. In taking these coins, Yato is paid what he really wants – worship.

While churches are places for Christians to congregate, shrines are primarily homes for kami. Their innermost chambers are closed to the public and contain sacred objects that represent the kami. Every town has a shrine, and mini-shrines often litter the roadside. I remember watching My Neighbor Totoro as a little kid and not understanding why there was a tiny building on the side of the road. This was probably a shrine for Totoro, who is a kami himself!

In my episode reviews for Noragami Aragoto, I refer to kami as gods, but that translation isn’t entirely accurate. For one thing, Shinto isn’t a monotheistic faith. There are tons of different kami, and not one of them has absolute authority over right and wrong. In some ways, they’re closer to Greek mythology – the other religious pantheon that Western viewers are most likely familiar with. Like Zeus and company, Shinto contains anthropomorphic figures of varying prominence who are associated with different parts of the natural world (the sun, the ocean, childbirth, etc.). But this definition also excludes kami that are more similar to monsters, animals, or even inanimate objects than humans. The fact of the matter is that almost anything supernatural in Japanese mythology counts as a kami. The Kojiki, the earliest surviving text on Japanese history/folklore, helpfully provides a definition for kami: “…any being whatsoever which possesses some eminent quality out of the ordinary, and is awe-inspiring, is called Kami.”

For instance, everything in the bathhouse from Spirited Away counts as a kami. This includes creatures as varied as the dragon-bishonen Haku, a talking frog, little black puffballs that pick up coal, and a mound of sentient garbage.

As Spirited Away also tells us, humans aren’t really supposed to intermingle with the world of kami. That’s because many kami are actually spirits of the dead. Shinto has ancestor worship, and while there is an afterlife, it’s not divided into spaces where sinners are punished and the righteous are exalted. The areas of the afterlife that make appearances in Noragami are tokoyo, takamagahara, and yomi, which all have associated legends that factor into the story.

Tokoyo is the vaguest. It refers to “another world” where kami live, described as a land across the sea. This appears in Noragami as “the far shore” – simultaneously a euphemism for the realm of kami and the mysterious origin place of Phantoms. While both takamagahara and yomi are treated like concrete places in Shinto, tokoyo is more abstract, most likely representing the mystery of what happens after death. Noragami‘s heroine Hiyori is described as having a particular strong connection to the far shore for a human, so she can perceive kami. The Japanese term for Phantoms, ayakashi, is actually a play on the word’s reference to the ocean. Ayakashi are a class of yokai (the monstrous variety of kami) that appear on the surface of a body of water. In Noragami, they arise in areas close to the “far shore.”

Takamagahara is “heaven,” but it’s more of a Mt. Olympus-type deal than a paradise for the dead. Kami with shrines live there, and Noragami renders it as an actual celestial neighborhood with classism and everything! The quality of a kami’s homestead matches up with the extent to which they’re worshipped, and famous deities like Bishamonten have sprawling estates. After obtaining an official follower in Hiyori, Yato manages to score himself some real estate there. Sure, it’s about five square yards of land, but that’s enough for both him and Yukine if they don’t mind snuggling. And Yato looks like he loves snuggling.

The final region is the underworld, or yomi. That’s where Yato ventures to rescue Ebisu in Noragami‘s latest arc. Yomi is most known as the place where Izanami, one of the most prominent kami, is imprisoned. In the Shinto creation myth, Izanami, the first woman, lived alongside her husband, the first man Izanagi. In this primordial world, she gave birth to most of the world’s kami, as well as the Japanese archipelago. However, she eventually perished while giving birth to a fire deity (for understandable reasons). A distraught Izanagi– who was nowhere near done populating the world – ventured into yomi to retrieve his wife’s spirit. But when he arrived, it turned out that she couldn’t leave. She’d already eaten food from the underworld and now belonged there (similar to the Greek myth of Persephone). Izanagi tried to get her out anyway, lighting a torch so that he could look around. However, instead of his wife’s beautiful face, he saw something distinctly lacking in flesh. Yomi had turned her into a hideous decaying corpse, and Izanagi was suddenly no longer interested. He dropped the torch and ran screaming out of the underworld with an enraged Izanami at his heels.

Although she raised an army of spirits to chase after him, Izanagi managed to get outside first and block off the entrance with a rock. He then divorced her by yelling at her through the rock. She yelled back that she’d kill 1,000 people a day in retribution, but Izanagi responded that he’d give life to 1,500 more. He then proceeded to take a purifying shower, during which his body produced three of the most important kami – the sun goddess Amaterasu, the moon god Tsukiyomi, and the storm god Susanoo. The Kojiki actually gives the entrance to yomi a specific geographic location. You can even visit it today!

In Noragami, Izanami is a shapeshifter. She’s very lonely, so she’ll appear as whoever makes her guest most comfortable in order to coax them to stay. Yato sees Hiyori in her, while Ebisu sees the owner of His Favorite restaurant. When the two attempt to escape, Izanami regains her monstrous true form. Ebisu’s parting remark to her, that he’s glad to have met his “mother,” are a reference to his origins – he’s Izanagi and Izanami’s first child.

Originally named Hiruko, Ebisu was born with either no limbs or bones, depending on the story. Since he couldn’t stand, his parents cast him off in a boat to die. However, he unexpectedly grew his limbs (or bones) back on the ship, becoming Ebisu, the patron of fishermen and merchants. Ebisu is generally depicted as a jolly fat man with a fishing rod. This contrasts sharply with his depiction in Noragami, where he’s stoic, young, and thin. Still, under this severe demeanor, Ebisu does share some traits with his folkloric counterpart. He’s very difficult to anger, taking everything in stride. He’s also clumsy as a relic of his childhood disability. One of Ebisu’s shinki even needs to control his body to have him fight properly, but this doesn’t mean he’s a pushover. Ebisu manages to defeat Yato, albeit with through shinki co-ownership shenanigans.

Ebisu is also a member of the Seven Lucky Gods, a group of the most worshipped deities in Japan. He’s actually the only one of these to have originated in Japan. The rest are all based on Chinese or Indian figures. Bishamonten, for example, originated as one of Buddhism’s Four Heavenly Kings, Vaisravana. Kazuma’s nickname for Bishamon, Veena, is based on another version of this name, Vessavana. Oddly, Shinto tradition depicts Bishamonten as an armored man and not a blonde woman in fetish wear. He holds a spear and a pagoda, which contains his hoard of treasure and armory. Noragami reimagines this aspect of the deity as Bishamon’s cadre of shinki. Like her inspiration, Bishamon is a guardian deity who smites evil – which becomes a problem when she defines “evil” as “Yato.”

Some Shinto deities were originally actual humans. Tenjin was a guy named Sugawara no Michizane who lived during the 9th century. A prominent scholar and politician, his career was ruined by a member of the Fujiwara family, who were Japan’s de facto rulers at the time. Soon after Michizane’s death in exile, the capital was engulfed in an enormous storm. Many Fujiwara died and most of their compound was destroyed. The imperial court decided that this was all caused by Michizane’s spirit and set about to placate it. They posthumously restored all of Michizane’s titles, deified him, and even built him a shrine. He was considered a calamity god at first, but that reputation changed as historians rediscovered his work as a scholar. Now Japanese students pray to him for help on their exams. So in a series with an exceptionally bad deal for an afterlife, Tenjin really scored the jackpot. It looks like most people end up as ghosts who wander around until they get adopted by shinki or turn into despair monsters, but Tenjin managed to become one of the most beloved and wealthy Shinto deities after he died. And all he had to do was smite his enemies!

The two other major kami characters, Yato and Kofuku, were invented for Noragami. I don’t speak Japanese, so I’m sure there’s a ton I didn’t catch about Shinto as it’s expressed in this series. Personally, I’m fascinated by how manga and anime creators interpret their religious figures in art. You can’t make a show about schoolchildren summoning Jesus to fight demons over here. Noragami is a great show and a great entry point into another culture. So who’s your favorite kami as depicted in Noragami? What are your favorite Shinto-inspired anime? Let us know in the comments!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

One-Punch Man is one of the most impressive TV anime productions this year, one that casual fans and experts, viewers and industry members are equally amazed by. These fans are so impressed by its visuals that the character designer and chief animation director Chikashi Kubota had to put out a tweet to clear up some misconceptions, saying that even if people were getting the impression that the show is being supported by a large animation budget, the truth is that they are working with average figures. He went on to explain that what we are seeing is the product of passionate artists doing their best. Finding out exactly who is behind all this spectacular craft seems like a good idea, then.

You might think that pointing out the series director as the main creative force is unnecessary, but more than ever this project has Shingo Natsume‘s soul at its core. One-Punch Man is the natural outcome of his career and what will hopefully get fans to acknowledge his worth. It hasn’t even been a decade since his first showing as Animation Director in Welcome to the NHK #4, which established him as a young animator to look out for due to his charismatic loose art and interesting layouts. His progression since then was nothing short of amazing – acquaintances secured him a spot as one of Gurren Lagann‘s regular animators, where amongst many other scenes he ended up animating a sequence in the finale together with Chikashi Kubota. Back then no one would have guessed those two would become the core team behind a project like One-Punch Man.

Natsume kept getting involved with notable animation pieces for a couple years until he got his chance to start his directional career. After a neat appetizer in the form of Umi Monogatari‘s OVA, he got his TV anime debut in Masaaki Yuasa‘s Tatami Galaxy of all things. With a confidence uncharacteristic of a newbie he crafted what might be the liveliest episode in the entire series, and already managed to attract a large number of talented animators who wanted to work with him. Seeing his modern projects act as magnets for skilled artists is less surprising when you realize he has always had that effect.

This short but hectic career filled with exciting projects had its paradigm shift with Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos, Natsume’s feature film debut. Assisting Kazuya Murata and with the legendary Kenichi Konishi supervising the animation, they crafted one of the most impressive movies the anime industry has ever – and will ever – put out. Animation was as much of a character in the film as anyone in the cast, and motion blatantly took preference over design consistency and such. It’s a wild animation spectacle that fully cemented his status as a sakuga director who will always be willing to embrace distinct styles that might not have a place in regular productions. Since the anime industry is mostly based on freelance connections and acquaintances, the more projects he’s involved with the more skilled individuals he will keep meeting, increasing the chances of that talent being a pillar in his next production. And so we can enjoy the work of Sejoon Kim – the best modern Gundam animator – as a regular animation director in One-Punch Man because he had been assisting Natsume doing a few cuts in the past. It can’t be understated how much this series benefits from his pedigree.

Another notable element of One-Punch Man‘s visuals is the digital animation, something also tied to Natsume’s presence. Throughout the years he has kept collaborating with members of the web generation (webgen for short) of animators, mostly youngsters who uploaded their work onto the internet before going professional. His personal animation style shares many traits with them so it’s no surprise that he has allowed free reign to pals like Gosei Oda and Norifumi Kugai, as well as other prominent figures of this movement like Ryuu Nakayama, Shun Enokido and Kenichi Fujisawa. Their idiosyncrasies are in full display, as the show makes no effort to hide them despite how at some points those stand out from the traditionally animated footage quite a lot. Rather than toning it down, Natsume has made them Action Animation Directors for the series and they have been trusted with climactic scenes like Kugai’s final fight in the first episode.

The strength of this group of animators lies mostly in action pieces, especially when it comes down to effects and debris. This makes One-Punch Man the perfect playground for webgens, who get to draw spectacular fights with a massive scale and no concerns for subtlety. As a collective they are often accused of having weak fundamentals that lead to wobbly and nonsensical character acting, but there is no need to even worry about delicate motion in a series like this. They are masters of lasers, explosions and punches, and that’s what they get to animate here.

In contrast to those digital animators stands Yoshimichi Kameda, who embodies the virtues of traditional animation. Anyone who has seen Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood knows Kameda, even if they aren’t yet aware of it. His role of Main Animator lead him to working on 17 episodes, where he ended up being in charge of many of the series iconic scenes like Mustang and Lust’s final showdown or King Bradley vs Greeling. If you recall any Brotherhood scene that truly stood out to you, chances are that it was Kameda’s work. Summing up his style as “memorable” would be vague but appropriate – he has inherited many traits of the modern Kanada School of animation, from the sharp timing of his sequences to their progression from exaggerated pose to exaggerated pose, as well as having a tendency to draw angular effects. There’s much more to him than that however, and one of the main reasons people quickly noticed his work was his ability to modulate the lineart and use intense strokes to animate fascinating sequences. Often you’ll see his cuts switch to a calculated rough look during their climax, a thicker linework that can range from pencil-like to looking like sumi-e brushes gone wild on an ink painting. Add to that the effective usage of impact frames and you get an artist with a voice so strong it’s impossible not to hear it.

And these quirks have all made it into One-Punch Man in significant fashion, of course; it’s not just out of sheer talent that I feel Kameda deserves some spotlight, he definitely is one of the key staff members when it comes to the show’s action. We’re halfway through the series and he already has many important scenes under his belt, from the most demanding sequence in the first episode to the closing cut in the opening. His eye-catching style has even gotten him to draw promotional illustrations, and they even trusted him to draw the amusing cover art for the opening’s single. Kameda’s influence extends even beyond his work directly as a key animator and illustrator however, since his output as one of One-Punch Man‘s Action Animation Directors has already caught everyone’s attention as well. Beyond what he directly animated in the third episode, you could feel his hand everywhere, the rough and thick lines reminding you who was in charge. Even during other animators’ notable sequences, a sudden spark of Kameda’s flames was enough to steal the spotlight, because his drawings have an incredible screen presence. Kameda belongs to the select club of animators who are just unfairly talented.

As much praise as I can give to the animation staff though, there is someone else who deserves special credit. People who have read Yusuke Murata’s version of One-Punch Man – the one the anime is based on – know that even before the anime, the series already was animated. Sort of. Sometimes rather arbitrarily, Murata would go on to draw sequences step-by-step with a ridiculous level of detail, almost as if they were key animation sheets. Something he is capable of putting off because he’s an exceptional and dedicated artist, but also because he is a fan of animation. For years we’ve known that he loves Yutaka Nakamura’s work (who funnily enough, was one of the main animators in Shingo Natsume‘s last project), and his interests became even more obvious when he decided to do some actual key animation work for Majin Bone, an anime series he had done the original character designs for. As an adaptation, the One-Punch Man anime has been smart enough to do its own thing and play to the strengths of the new medium, but the series was already conceived with motion in mind. It only feels right that the work of a genius mangaka with a passion for animation would end up being adapted by animation fanatics.

I don’t believe One-Punch Man‘s adaptation is perfect by any stretch, since the strength of the craft seems extremely lopsided towards animation – the direction is simply functional, only Natsume’s boards so far have stood above a pedestrian level, and the backgrounds and palette are subpar. Seeing how well it works in spite of that only makes the work of this animation team feel more amazing however, since it makes it clear that they can support the show on their own. One-Punch Man is an amusing yet simple concept carried by exceptional execution, be it Murata’s art in the manga or this team’s incredible animation in the TV series. Under normal circumstances it could get tiresome rather fast, but it has been blessed with artists who can turn this one gag into a full series that’s always exciting to look at. Chikashi Kubota asked everyone to acknowledge their work and efforts, and I think they have earned that.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
 camp

 

The 10 Best Manga Series to read now. All of these titles are big in Japan, but many are also popular throughout the world. Highly recommended reading!

Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Naruto is know for its amazing art work. Naruto covers are a colorful representation of the manga from within. The cover all have amazing symbolism and value. The covers all have a message and say something about the story. The covers also provide color to the black and white manga, before the anime. Some covers say something special and we have created the “Top 10 Naruto Manga Cover Art” and the message the covers tell. Here we go.
10. Volume 48- The Cheering Village
This cover depicts a master and his two students at different parts of his life. Jiraiya was an amazing teacher and he found his legacy in one of his students and his end at the hand of the other. This cover also shows the similarities between Naruto and Nagato, besides the “to” at the end of their name. They both came from the same place and were trained by the same person. Jiraiya saw the future in his apprentices and the fate of the ninja world and he was right since their epic battle. This volume’s cover art also has Jiraiya’s book in the background speaking on the story he told.   
9. Volume 41- Jiraiya’s Decision

This cover art depicts Akatsuki all together in a rare occurrence with Naruto in the background. All the members are there, even Orochimaru and his trade mark white snake.  Pain stands as the leader. This picture is the only official picture of the group as a whole, a rare scene. Naruto being in the background as the one who will defeat the organization.  Naruto is looking directly with conviction and determination.   

Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Rank Title Creator(s)
1. The Ancient Magus’ Bride (Mahō Tsukai no Yome) Kore Yamazaki
2. My Hero Academia (Boku no Hero Academia) Kōhei Horikoshi
3. Nietzsche-sensei – Konbini ni, Satori Sedai no Shinjin ga Maiorita (Mr. Nietzsche in the Convenience Store) Koma Matsu, Hashimoto
4. Tanaka-kun wa Itsumo Kedaruge Nozomi Uda
5. Orange Ichigo Takano
6. ReLIFE Sou Yayoi
7. Handa-kun Satsuki Yoshino
8. The Heroic Legend of Arslan (Arslan Senki) Hiromu Arakawa, Yoshiki Tanaka
9. Kasane Daruma Matsūra
10. Amaama to Inazuma Gido Amagakure
11. Koudai-ke no Hitobito Kozueko Morimoto
12. Hatarakanai Futari Satoru Yoshida
13. Kiss Him, Not Me (Watashi ga Motete Dōsunda) Junko
14. Hinomaru Zumō Kawada
15. Dagashi Kashi Kotoyama

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Finally, some supporting characters! I was beginning to wonder when we’d see all those previously unknown faces from the new opening sequence. They even come in a wide variety of flavors, including ditzy reporter, easygoing soldier dude, and no-nonsense military police girl. Enjoy them while you can, because the show doesn’t seem to have any qualms about killing them off in order to move the story along.

This week’s setup is pretty complex, even by Heavy Object‘s standards. The Baby Magnum crew is tasked with taking down a hostile country’s mining operation, but the terrain in the area gives the enemy’s Object a big advantage in a head-on fight. In order to level the playing field, Havia and a few of his fellow soldiers have to sneak in on foot and sabotage a radar station. The station is guarded by a group of UAVs, so Qwenthur and some of his fellow “students on deployment” must hack the flying drones to let Havia’s group pass through unnoticed. If all of that goes as planned, Milinda is set to roll in with Baby Magnum and blow up everything in sight. The only problem is that one of the students in Qwenthur’s group turns out to be a traitor and shoots his unsuspecting comrades in the back.

This is a return to the more complicated storylines that characterized Heavy Object‘s early plot arcs, and that means we’ve got plenty of exposition to slog through. The vast majority of the episode is dedicated to explaining the mission and developing the new characters. The thorough explanations are useful when it comes to making sense out of the multi-step operation, but no amount of playful banter between the characters can keep this from being a very dry viewing experience. It’s perfectly tolerable for anyone who’s managed to keep up with Heavy Object‘s technical lectures over the course of the season, but it’s not exactly what I’d call compelling wartime drama.

While the stampede of new faces can be a lot to process, expanding the team has some interesting effects on the complexion of the series. Instead of trading witty complaints with one another, Qwenthur and Havia are dropped into separate groups that are more closely matched to their areas of expertise. Surrounding Havia with other professional soldiers creates a team with a more casual attitude towards danger; they all see taking risks as part of the job, so their gallows humor is a little calmer and more irreverent. Qwenthur’s student team lacks any pretense of toughness or bravery, which gives him a chance to be more open about his motivations for choosing to study on a battlefield. We even get to see a different side of Frolaytia, as the presence of a TV reporter has her tripping over her normally eloquent litanies of threats and profanity. Even if we haven’t really learned enough about the new characters to form much of an attachment to them, their presence is proving to be useful for developing the core cast.

Since the mission doesn’t start going off the rails until the end of this episode, it’s hard to guess where things will go from here. There are enough wild cards and moving parts that just about anything can happen, though I’m willing to bet that we’ll see a few more casualties before all is said and done. As grim as it may sound, that’s one of the advantages of having a larger cast: it’s easier for someone to die without bringing the narrative to a screeching halt, and the higher possibility of someone biting the bullet helps crank up the dramatic tension. Because the mission relies on a lot of events going as planned, it’s likely that we’ll also see plenty of improvised heroics from the main characters.

A slow-moving start makes it difficult for this episode to stand on its own, but that methodical preparation could certainly pay off over the next couple weeks. Knowing my luck, I’ll probably pick out a couple favorites from the new group of characters just in time for those people to get the axe. Remember, new kids: keep your heads down, don’t tell anyone about the restaurant you’re planning to open when you get home, and try not to stand next to any of the heroes when the bullets start flying.

403 Forbidden

Request forbidden by administrative rules.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

It wasn’t a stretch of the imagination to think that this week’s episode of Haikyu!! would be a tense one. With Daichi out thanks to his collision with Tanaka and Ennoshita, one of the previously underused second years, taking his place, things were already a little rocky. To make matters even worse, Karasuno manages to lose the second set, sending the game into a third, all-or-nothing, match. To say that the players are on edge would be a severe understatement.

Thanks to some highly effective music, that tension transfers over to the audience very clearly. The soundtrack for episode eighteen is anxious and intense, perfectly enhancing the players’ moods and helping to convey the urgency of the situation. Also well done on this front are the various speed-ups and slow downs in the action – not in terms of what’s actually going on, but rather in how the animation shows it. In probably the most breathtaking scene of the episode (and I’m inclined to say the season, but that may be hyperbole), Hinata makes a running dive for the ball, causing him to almost run into the benches the coach, adviser, and manager are sitting on, which makes Ukai jump up to move the bench, tossing Takeda to the ground. Hinata quickly recovers, gets up, and sprints back to the net to hit the ball, all in under a minute. It’s busy and impressively smooth, as well as being the kind of scene that makes you hold your breath, wondering if he’s going to pull it off. Then later in the episode the opposite effect is used – a jump is slowed down to the degree that we can see Hinata shift ever-so-slightly to block the ball, giving his movement and almost gliding effect. Since this is the moment when the captain of Wakunan realizes that he’s been outdone, it’s important, but it’s also powerful, revealing the understanding both players have of the game.

The real meat of the episode once again belongs to Ennoshita, though. He’s clearly convinced himself that he doesn’t belong on the court with the rest of the regular players and is wallowing in his self-perceived inferiority. That no one else thinks he’s imposing or unworthy keeps escaping him; even Nishinoya’s compliment ultimately washes over him. It’s true, he’s not as good as some of the others and he isn’t Daichi, but what he can’t see is that he really is capable of not just playing, but of leading. His plan about who should cover what kind of ball is spot-on and he’s the one who really saves the day, in more ways than one. But the scene of him basically hiding in the bathroom to cry tells us that he can’t see what he’s done right – all that stands out to him are the ways in which he failed. While there are other insecure members of the volleyball team (and with the players being high schoolers, it would be frankly weird if there weren’t), no one quite takes it to the same level of anxiety that Ennoshita does. This is our second real clue that Ennoshita is, at heart, a socially anxious person. The feeling of safety and comfort he described last week when he was sitting at home alone, away from the yelling and the pressure, makes this week’s post-game breakdown and constant worrying seem less like the result of what’s going on and more like his reaction to things he has a hard time coping with. When you factor in that scene last week of him clinging to the wall in order to avoid being dragged to practice, he comes out as even more of the winner in this game: he had a lot more to overcome than just not being a regular player. For Ennoshita this wasn’t just a match against a strong team, it was a fight against himself and his own anxieties, and as anyone with anxiety can tell you, pulling through in a battle can still make it feel like you’re losing the war. Hopefully we’ll keep seeing Ennoshita even with Daichi’s return, because I definitely want to see how he develops.

On a less serious note, this week’s episode also feature such bizarre (to me) bonding rituals such as “punch the injured guy in the gut a lot to show how happy you are to see him” and several instances of Kageyama and Hinata flailing their fists at each other. Those, along with Asahi’s barely concealed panic when Kageyama and Hinata bump into each other at the net, help add a much-needed lightness to the episode, which is nice because I don’t think the eye-catches would have quite cut it this time. This is really a parallel episode to the end of the first season, when Karasuma lost and the boys went home crying in frustration and regret – it very nearly ended that way again, and for Wakunan, well, this is that episode. It’s a strong reminder that even though we’re rooting for Karasuma, the other teams aren’t just “bad guys.” Everyone is invested in these games, and this episode, along with doing many other things right, also doesn’t let us forget that for every team who wins, there’s another who have to call themselves “the losers.”

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Ajin

Synopsis

Ajin are humans that cannot die. Seventeen years ago, they first appeared on a battlefield in Africa. From then on, more of their kind are discovered within the human society. Their rarity in appearance means that, for experimental purposes, the government will generously reward anyone who captures one. In the present day, for what a certain high school student expects to be a typical summer holiday, his life is about to turn unexpected…

Information

Type: TV
Episodes: 13
Status: Currently Airing
Aired: Jan 16, 2016 to ?
Premiered: Winter 2016
Producers: None found
Licensors: None found
Studios: Polygon Pictures
Source: Manga
Genres: Adventure, Horror, Mystery, Seinen, Supernatural
Duration: 24 min. per ep.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Bubuki Buranki

When Azuma Ikki returns to Japan after 10 years, he gets assaulted by a group of armed men and becomes their prisoner. Kogane Asabuki, a childhood friend, saves him with a weapon on her right hand known as Bubuki; a weapon with its own mind. Azuma Ikki, who is a Bubuki user himself, learns about the existence of Bubuki and goes on a journey alongside the companions he has found, in an attempt to find and revive Oumai, a Buranki (titan) who sleeps underground.

Anime data

Type : TV
Status : currently airing
Start : Jan 9, 2016
Season : winter 2016
Main Studio : SANZIGEN
Genres : ActionSci-Fi
Hashtag : #ブブキ
Romaji : Bubuki Buranki
English : BBK/BRNK
Japanese : ブブキ・ブランキ

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Dimension W

In the year 2071, the world’s energy problems seem solved by a network of cross-dimensional electric-field inductors- “coils” -that extract energy from a seemingly infinite source. That source is the W dimension, a fourth plane that exists beyond the X, Y, and Z dimensions.

In this world, unofficial “illegal” coils harness powers that the police can’t hope to counter. Dealing with these coils is the job of coil-hating repo man Kyoma, whose run-in with the unique coil android Mira leads the two to form a reluctant partnership.

Anime data

Type : TV
Status : currently airing
Start : Jan 10, 2016
Season : winter 2016
Main Studio : Studio 3Hz
Producers : Orange
Genres : ActionSci-FiSeinen
Hashtag : #DW
Romaji : Dimension W
Japanese : ディメンション ダブリュー

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
1 2 3 19

Welcome

WELCOME to OUR SITE – This site provide complete information about Comics Manga and Anime. Thank you for visit.

Tweets

403 Forbidden

Request forbidden by administrative rules.